RSS Feed

Tag Archives: Bible

Divine Promises

Promise
As we prepare to celebrate Easter it wouldn’t be fitting if we didn’t first recount the events that took place in the life of Jesus individually and at our place of worship during what is known as Passion Week, the time from His triumphal entry to resurrection. Jesus spent most of his time in Bethany, just two miles east of Jerusalem on the opposite slope of the Mount of Olives. He probably stayed at the home of Mary, Martha, and Lazarus. Jesus spent Thursday night praying in the Garden of Gethsemane. Friday and Saturday nights Jesus’ body lay in the garden tomb. [Billye Brim describes the third day from her book The Blood and the Glory.]
The third day, our Lord Jesus arose- triumphant over death, hell and the grave-and carried His own precious blood into the Heavenly Holy of Holies where it was accepted for you, me, our families and generations to come.

The precious blood of Christ- 1 Peter 1:19

Hebrews 6: 9-12

But, beloved, we are confident of better things concerning you, yes, things that accompany salvation, though we speak in this manner. For God is not unjust to forget your work and labor of love which you have shown toward His name, in that you have ministered to the saints, and do minister. And we desire that each one of you show the same diligence to the full assurance of hope until the end, that you do not become sluggish, but imitate those who through faith and patience inherit the promises.

 Let’s consider a few redeeming lives of those who have gone before us, and their maturing attributes, as they trusted in that which Christ had promised:

Thomas may have doubted until Jesus revealed himself, but he didn’t allow the doubt to remain. He matured through his belief while stating, “My Lord and my God!” Selah. [John 20:26-29 you are blessed for believing yet having not seen]

Abraham received great promises from God. Many which seemed impossible to be realized, yet Abraham trusted God with confidence and active faith. [Mature choice(s) in righteousness]

Jeremiah accused God of being unreliable [15:18]. God reminded Jeremiah of His promise to stand by him [12:5,6; 15:19,20]. Jeremiah’s questioning of God forms one of the best examples in the Bible of what it means to follow God in spite of everything. [Jeremiah matured in his depth of understanding as well as in the spiritual challenge]
Hebrews 12:2 AMP

[Looking away from all that will distract us and] focusing our eyes on Jesus, who is the Author and Perfecter of faith [the first incentive for our belief and the One who brings our faith to maturity], who for the joy [of accomplishing the goal] set before Him endured the cross, disregarding the shame, and sat down at the right hand of the throne of God [revealing His deity, His authority, and the completion of His work].

I love how this one verse in Hebrews 12:2 starts with encouragement that enfolds us, you and I, in the assurance of Christ. The perfecting of faith is a part of our maturing. The word focus by definition is the center of interest or activity; focusing our eyes on Jesus is strategic victory for our completion [the will & purposes] as we follow a divine and supreme example.
Do you have promises from God that seem too incredible to fulfill?

Hear the integrity of His own heart in this verse.

Hebrews 6:17-18
Thus God, determining to show more abundantly to the heirs of promise the immutability of His counsel, confirmed it by an oath, that by two immutable things, in which it is impossible for God to lie, we might have strong consolation, who have fled for refuge to lay hold of the hope set before us.

Isaiah 26:4 MSG – “Depend on God and keep at it because in the Lord God you have a sure thing.”

Deborah Somjak
Unfolded Hearts Ministry

Cited Resource Chronological Life Application Study Bible

Let’s apply our diligence.

For this very reason, applying your diligence [to the divine promises, make every effort] in [exercising] your faith to, develop moral excellence, and in moral excellence, knowledge (insight, understanding), and in your knowledge, self-control, and in your self-control, steadfastness, and in your steadfastness, godliness, and in your godliness, brotherly affection, and in your brotherly affection, [develop Christian] love [that is, learn to unselfishly seek the best for others and to do things for their benefit]. For as these qualities are yours and are increasing [in you as you grow toward spiritual maturity], they will keep you from being useless and unproductive in regard to the true knowledge and greater understanding of our Lord Jesus Christ.
2 Peter 1:5-8 AMP

 

Pray for Peace

Pray for Peace

Pray for the peace of Jerusalem: “May they prosper who love you.”
Psalm 122:6

Recommended Reading
Galatians 3:7-9
Three times each year the men of Israel journeyed to Jerusalem to celebrate three feasts: Passover, Pentecost, and Tabernacles (Deuteronomy 16:16; Acts 2:1, 9-11). Most scholars believe the fifteen “Songs of Ascents”—Psalms 120–134—were sung by the pilgrims as they ascended to Jerusalem. Psalm 122 exhorts the faithful in Israel to “pray for the peace of Jerusalem.” Jerusalem was the heart of Israel—the site of the temple, the center of Jewish worship. All the descendants of Abraham knew that Jerusalem, the place where God dwelt, was God’s city of peace.
Should we continue to pray for the peace of Jerusalem today? For a host of reasons, yes! Perhaps the best reason is the same reason the ancient Israelites prayed for Jerusalem: They were descendants of Israel bound by the covenants of God to His holy city. The New Testament teaches that those who have faith in God’s salvation plans, whether Jew or Gentile, “are sons of Abraham” (Galatians 3:7). Jerusalem, the most embattled city on earth, is still very much in God’s plans.

Pray for the peace of God’s city and God’s chosen people who remain “the apple of His eye” (Zechariah 2:8).

If I forget you, O Jerusalem, let my right hand forget its skill!
Babylonian exiles, Psalm 137:5

By: Dr. David Jeremiah

Deborah 4 Unfolded Hearts

Charles Spurgeon

Thou shalt guide me with thy counsel, and afterward receive me to glory. Psalm 73:24

The Psalmist felt his need of divine guidance. He had just been discovering the foolishness of his own heart, and lest he should be constantly led astray by it, he resolved that God’s counsel should henceforth guide him. A sense of our own folly is a great step towards being wise, when it leads us to rely on the wisdom of the Lord. The blind man leans on his friend’s arm and reaches home in safety, and so would we give ourselves up implicitly to divine guidance, nothing doubting; assured that though we cannot see, it is always safe to trust the all‐seeing God. “Thou shalt,” is a blessed expression of confidence. He was sure that the Lord would not decline the condescending task. There is a word for thee, O believer; rest thou in it.

Be assured that thy God will be thy counsellor and friend; He shall guide thee; He will direct all thy ways.

 In His written Word thou hast this assurance in part fulfilled, for holy Scripture is His counsel to thee. Happy are we to have God’s Word always to guide us! What were the mariner without his compass? And what were the Christian without the Bible? This is the unerring chart, the map in which every shoal is described, and all the channels from the quicksands of destruction to the haven of salvation mapped and marked by one who knows all the way. Blessed be Thou, O God, that we may trust Thee to guide us now, and guide us even to the end! After this guidance through life, the Psalmist anticipates a divine reception at last—”and afterward receive me to glory.” What a thought for thee, believer! God Himself will receive thee to glory—thee! Wandering, erring, straying, yet He will bring thee safe at last to glory!

This is thy portion; live on it this day, and if perplexities should surround thee, go in the strength of this text straight to the throne.

Thou shalt guide me with thy counsel, and afterward receive me to glory.

 Debbie 4 Unfoldedhearts